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Construction Industry Catalog Sales

The construction industry offers some of the most exciting careers in today’s work place. This is a great place for a young man or woman, who has finished high school, to find a good profession. The construction industries employs carpenters, labors, electricians, plumbers, steel workers, heating and air-condition works, and brick layers. The construction industries also drive huge sales in manufactured tool products. Tools of the trade can be an expensive investment for a young person right out of high school; however, one can find help by applying for apprentice training through a local community college or union. There is also grant money available to help cover the cost of the tools you need for the job. Once you have decided on the as a career path you will need to get information on specific tools you will need for your trade and this can be done by looking a construction industry catalog sales websites.

Construction industry catalog sales websites have information on tools and where and how they are used. This is a good place to find information on tools and their cost without having to spend time and money looking for stores in your area that have the product you are interested in knowing more about. Online construction industry catalog sales generally have the best prices for tools and other equipment then most local stores. One can compare and prices items easier through construction industry catalog web sites then by calling local stores. It is faster and more convenient to find prices from online catalogs.

Most tool manufactures today have websites with informative information about their tools. This is one of the best places to start before actually buying a product. See what kind of information they have on their tools. Is there site user friendly? Is it easy to find information on their site? These are question one should ask as they visit tool manufacture sites. If there site are hard to navigate and are not appealing then there may be a bigger problem with the company. There are also websites that rate products and they have information from people who have actually used the products on the job site. Therefore, a person can get real information about how a product performance and how truly reliable product is. In today information age a person can always find out how a product is performing by simple type the name of the tool and reliability into a search engine and look at the results. This is something that is recommended before a person buys anything see what other are saying about the product.

How the Recession Is Affecting the Commercial Construction Industry

The ‘Great Recession’ theoretically lasted about 18 months, from 2007 to 2009. Recovery has been agonizingly slow in many industries but we are now in 2015 and the construction industry is more rapidly shrugging off the residual effects of the recession.

How Bad Was It?

Even though construction industry is cyclical and recession typically follows a boom period, nothing could have prepared it for the harsh and widespread reach of the recession:

Residential: Homeowners defaulted on homes and others delayed buying homes, leading to a glut of residential real estate languishing in realtors’ inventory.

Commercial: Commercial construction also was hard hit, severely impacted by the federal budget sequester and eventual-but-temporary shutdown, followed by scaled back government spending, and sharply reduced lending practices.

Institutional: Institutional construction remained stagnant, affected by the same limitations and funding problems that the commercial construction sector faced.

How Were Construction Workers Affected?

Nevada, California, Florida, and Arizona are typically areas with plenty of construction work. But the recession changed that:

Nevada employed an estimated 146,000 construction workers at the peak of its construction boom. That number was reduced by 59 percent.

Arizona’s construction employment dropped 50 percent from its pre-recession industry peak.

Florida was close on the industry-related unemployment heels of Nevada and Arizona, losing 40 percent of its construction workforce.

California fared better but still recorded a 28 percent drop.

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), approximately 2.3 million construction workers lost their jobs in the recession (nearly 30 percent of the total number of lost jobs).

The overall construction industry has an estimated 1.4 million fewer construction workers in 2015 than it did in 2007.

The Construction Outlook in 2015 and Beyond

Happily, the U.S. and its construction industry continue to move away from the harshest effects of the Great Recession. Industry observers expect to see these improvements:

Non-residential construction: picking up and looking more solid, especially with the expected 2.6 percent real GDP growth in 2015. This sector may rise by 8 percent with growth in office buildings, hotels, and industrial facilities.

Single family housing: expected to increase by 11 percent in the number of residential units, thanks to easier access to home mortgage loans.

Manufacturing plant construction: will probably drop about 16 percent after huge increases of 2013 and 2014.

Institutional construction: expected to continue its moderate upward trend and increase 9% over 2014 results.

Residential construction: called the potential ‘wild card’ of 2015 because of rising interest rates. Existing home sales may climb toward 10 percent.

Public construction: growth will remain low due to ongoing federal spending constraints. However, transportation spending is expected to grow by about 2.2 percent.

Ironically, construction workers may not be rushing to return to new jobs. Many left the industry altogether, retraining for other employment.

Texas and North Dakota both show significant increases in construction employment. North Dakota now needs to recruit construction workers. Texas’ construction employment is up 10 percent, nearing its pre-recession peak.

Economists don’t expect the construction industry to return to its peak level (2006) until 2022 or later. However, the BLS anticipates that the fastest-growing jobs now and 2022 will be in healthcare and construction.

So while the Great Recession did a considerable amount of damage to the overall economy, individual incomes, and morale, 2015 and beyond are looking considerably more favorable in the commercial construction industry.

How Scotland Is Rebuilding Its Construction Industry

The slump in the Scottish economy showed that output decreased by 0.2 per cent during Quarter 1 in 2012 with a further decrease in Quarter 2 of 0.4 per cent, which equalled the UK decline in GDP as a whole, and a decline in manufacturing of over 2 per cent. Much of the downturn has impacted the construction sector which has shrunk by 10 per cent during 2012.

However this decrease in the construction sector has spurred construction leaders and developers in Scotland to come together and launch optimistic and ambitious growth plans to combat the decline for the next four years. The strategy called `Building for the Future’ will be driven by a new Construction Scotland industry leadership group.

The group is the lead and key organisation for the Scottish building industry and is formed to direct and unite the industry and act as the voice for the industry. The group is made up from a variety of organisations including the public sector, colleges, trade bodies, businesses and universities and is recognised as the leader in and voice of the construction industry by the Scottish Government.

The plans and priorities set out for building the Scottish construction industry and pushing for growth is by developing a more successful construction industry, driving innovation and productivity, working in partnership to deliver a low carbon environment and establishing a cohesive voice for the industry in Scotland.

The strategy outlines putting innovation at the heart of the construction industry and to pursue global markets, growing exports by 10 per cent.The strategy also outlines an increase in collaboration between construction sector businesses and within the supply chain. In order to increase productivity, improving the workforce’s skills, improving process and systems and enhancing design and specification will be at the core of activity to drive improved productivity in the sector.

The plan also states that it aims to reduce carbon emissions by 42 per cent by 2020 by producing more carbon-efficient products and constructing zero-carbon buildings. The sector will also work in conjunction with colleges and universities to advance research for carbon-friendly building and construction.

The strategy overall aims to increase the profitability of the Scottish construction industry and its holistic contribution to the Scottish economy and to boost its recovery from the dramatic decline it has seen during the past year in 2012.

The strategy is also dependent upon the cohesive collaboration and co-operation of all parties within the sector including agencies, local authorities, smaller construction companies and the Scottish Government. It is also hoped that the Construction Scotland reputation and brand will be enhanced globally and that quality construction services and products can be innovated, used and exported both across Scotland and overseas markets.